Assembly Bill 1651 or the Workplace Technology Accountability Act, a new bill proposed by California Assembly Member Ash Kalra, would regulate employers, and their vendors, regarding the use of employee data.  Under the bill, data is defined as “any information that identifies, relates to, describes, is reasonably capable of being associated with, or could reasonably be linked, directly or indirectly, with a particular worker, regardless of how the information is collected, inferred, or obtained.” 
Continue Reading California Assembly Proposes Data Privacy Law for Workers

The Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification (“WARN”) Act requires employers to give employees at least 60 days’ notice when a “mass layoff” is about to occur at a “single site of employment,” which is typically a single location or a group of contiguous work locations.  Courts are beginning to confront the question of what constitutes a “single site of employment” under the WARN Act for employees working remotely, and how remote work policies impact class certification considerations.  Given the prevalence of remote work during the pandemic and the likely continuation of such work arrangements, these decisions are of particular importance to employers considering mass layoffs or facing class actions based on the application of remote work policies or practices.
Continue Reading Remote Employees Can Bring Class Action Under The WARN Act

Artificial intelligence is changing the way companies interact with their employees. HuntonAK’s new Labor and Employment Emerging Technology Practice is focused on helping companies navigate artificial intelligence, process automation and technological advancements that are impacting employers across all industries.
Continue Reading HuntonAK’s New Labor and Employment Emerging Technology Practice

With the age of artificial intelligence unfolding, products aimed at automating the recruiting and hiring process are hitting the market with increasing frequency.  Companies have been utilizing AI for tasks such as screening resumes, and even interviewing candidates and assessing whether they will be successful employees.
Continue Reading New York City Introduces Bill to Regulate the Use of AI in Employment Decisions

Restrictive covenants and non-compete agreements are increasingly under attack, this time by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Companies rely on these restrictions to protect investment in intellectual property, technology and employees. On January 9, the FTC suggested that employee freedom of mobility trumps all of these legitimate business reasons companies use restrictive covenants and non-compete agreements.
Continue Reading FTC Commissioners Advocate Restrictions on Non-Compete Agreements; Seek Comments on Potential Rulemaking

Imagine a future in which Artificial Intelligence does the recruiting and hiring at U.S. companies.  Every new hire will be the uniquely perfect candidate whose skills, personality, presence, temperament, and work habits are a flawless match for the job.  Performance management and poor performance become extinct, relics from an age in which humans brought primitive instincts, biases, and flawed intuition to hiring and employment decisions.
Continue Reading Illinois Enacts AI Interview Law Amid an International Trend Toward Regulation

The California Labor Code requires employers to reimburse employees for certain expenses, but it’s not always clear which expenses should be reimbursed by the employer, and which expenses should be borne by employees.  Here’s a list of Five Things to Remember About Employee Reimbursements to help California employers navigate this area of the law.
Continue Reading Five Things to Remember About Employee Reimbursements in California

On February 12, 2018, the EEOC released its Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 2018-2022. In a press release, the EEOC indicated the plan “will serve as a framework for the Commission in achieving its mission to prevent and remedy unlawful employment discrimination and advance equal opportunity for all in the workplace.”
Continue Reading EEOC Releases Strategic Plan for 2018-2022 Fiscal Years

All employers have personnel data on their information technology systems and devices, making cyber insurance coverage one way to protect against the cost and exposure created by data breaches. In the second of this two-part interview, Hunton & Williams partners Emily Burkhardt Vicente and Walter Andrews discuss certain types of cyber insurance policies, potential gaps in coverage to watch out for, and other tips employers should keep in mind when considering cyber insurance coverage.
Continue Reading Labor & Employment Quick Takes: Top Insurance Issues Facing Employers, Part 2