The legal path between employee arbitration agreements under the Federal Arbitration Act (“FAA”) and representative claims under the California Private Attorney General Act (“PAGA”) has been anything but smooth. A new (albeit unpublished and uncitable) case, Piran v. Yamaha Motor Corp., et al., No. G062198, 2024 WL 484845 (Cal. Ct. App. Feb. 8, 2024)(unpub.) (“Yamaha”), helps to illustrate the challenges and unanswered questions lingering in the wake of this rapidly-developing area of law.
Continue Reading In High Stakes Battle Between Arbitration and PAGA, Wins, Losses, and Questions

On December 6, 2023, the US Supreme Court heard arguments for Muldrow v. City of St. Louis, which may have significant implications for discrimination cases under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. Specifically, the Supreme Court in this case could clarify whether Title VII of the Civil Rights Act requires a clear showing of significant disadvantage or tangible harm to have an actionable claim.
Continue Reading The Potential Impacts of Muldrow v. City of St. Louis On The Limits of Workplace Discrimination Allegations

On September 29, 2023, the U.S. Supreme Court granted certiorari in Bissonnette v. LePage Bakeries Park St. LLC, a case from the Second Circuit Court of Appeals involving application of the Federal Arbitration Act’s (“FAA”) exemption for transportation workers.
Continue Reading The Supreme Court To Further Clarify “Transportation Worker” Exemption to the FAA

Several prominent business groups filed an amicus brief in the Supreme Court of the United States on July 24 urging the Court to reform its standard on agency deference and highlighting the unpredictability caused by the National Labor Relations Board’s (“NLRB”) current application of the lenient standard.
Continue Reading Business Groups Tap Hunton for Amicus Filing in Supreme Court Agency Deference Case

On June 30, 2023, the U.S. Supreme Court in 303 Creative, LLC v. Elenis held that the First Amendment prohibits Colorado from compelling a website designer to engage in expressive conduct that conflicts with her beliefs.
Continue Reading Supreme Court Says First Amendment Permits Wedding Website Designer to Deny Services to Same-Sex Couples Despite State Antidiscrimination Law

On June 29, 2023, the U.S. Supreme Court in Groff v. DeJoy clarified the “undue hardship” standard under which it can deny a religious accommodation under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In a unanimous opinion authored by Justice Alito, the Court rejected a “de minimis cost” test, and held that an employer denying a religious accommodation must show that the burden of granting an accommodation “would result in substantial increased costs in relation to the conduct of its particular business.”
Continue Reading Supreme Court Clarifies “Undue Hardship” Standard for Title VII Religious Accommodation Claims

Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP labor and employment attorneys will focus on importance of creating and implementing thoughtful and compliant DEI programs. Our speakers will highlight case law addressing company DEI policies and programs, review the emerging trends surrounding DEI policies, and how best to implement accountable and lawful programs.
Continue Reading CLE Webinar Invite – Is DEI Dead? What the Supreme Court’s Harvard/UNC Affirmative Action Decisions Mean For DEI Initiatives

The U.S. Supreme Court in Students for Fair Admissions, Inc. v. President and Fellows of Harvard College decided that the race-based admissions programs at Harvard College and the University of North Carolina (the “Schools”) violated the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. While the Court answered the question for publicly funded schools, it is an open question whether, and how, the Court’s decision will impact affirmative action and diversity programs for private employers, as discussed in more detail below.Continue Reading How The U.S. Supreme Court’s Ruling On College Affirmative Action Programs May Impact Private Employers

On May 2, 2022, the Supreme Court granted certiorari to Helix Energy Solutions Group Incorporated after Helix lost before the en banc United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit in a sharply-divided opinion last year.  In Hewitt v. Helix Energy Solutions Grp., Inc., 15 F.4th 289 (5th Cir. 2021), the Fifth Circuit held 12-6 that employers must guarantee their day-rate workers a minimum weekly payment that is reasonably related to the amount those workers actually earn in that timespan for their workers to be exempt from the FLSA’s overtime requirements.  This minimum weekly payment must be a predetermined amount that does not change based on the number of days or hours actually worked, if the employer wishes to enjoy the FLSA’s exemptions to paying its day-rate workers overtime.
Continue Reading Supreme Court Will Consider Helix Day Rate Pay Case