A memorandum recently released by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has clarified the agency’s position on whether safety incentive programs and post-accident drug testing would be considered retaliatory pursuant to its controversial recordkeeping rule published on May 12, 2016.  This rule prohibits employers from retaliating against employees who report work-related injuries or instituting procedures that could chill employees from reporting work-related injuries. In the accompanying interpretative documents, OSHA specifically identified workplace safety incentive programs and post-accident drug testing policies as procedures that were likely to deter employee reporting, and therefore would be subject to increased scrutiny by the agency.

Continue Reading OSHA Clarifies Stance on Anti-Retaliation Measures to the Relief of Employers

Last week, the United States Supreme Court released its decision in Digital Realty Trust v. Somers, where the Court unanimously adopted a narrow reading of the Dodd-Frank Act’s anti-retaliation “whistleblower” provision.  The Court held that the provision applies only to individuals who report securities violations directly to the Securities and Exchange Commission.

The case involved Paul Somers, a former employee of Digital Realty Trust, who alleged that the company terminated him after he internally reported suspected violations of securities law by the company.  Somers, however, never reported any of the suspected securities violations to the SEC.

Continue Reading Supreme Court Narrowly Interprets Dodd-Frank’s Definition of Whistleblower

On January 21, 2016, the EEOC announced that it will seek public input on proposed enforcement guidance addressing retaliation and related issues under federal employment discrimination laws.  The EEOC issued its last guidance update on the subject of retaliation in 1998.  The EEOC’s 73 page draft guidance is available for review here and the 30-day input period ends on February 24, 2016.

Continue Reading EEOC Seeks to Expand Retaliation Claims in Proposed Enforcement Guidance – Public Input Sought

For years, there has been nearly universal agreement among the courts that managers do not engage in “protected activity” for retaliation claim purposes under most employment laws when they raise concerns about compliance issues in the regular course of performing their job duties. The traditional reasoning held that a manager whose job includes evaluating and/or reporting compliance issues, and who does so in furtherance of his or her job duties, should not become cloaked in anti-retaliation protection for merely doing the job he or she is employed to do. Instead, to engage in protected activity, the manager must step outside his or her role as a manager and become adversarial to the employer. The so-called “manager rule” has been consistently used by courts to reject retaliation claims under various employment statutes by human resources professionals and supervisors who report employment-related compliance issues related to other employees.

Continue Reading 9th Circuit Tosses Aside “Manager Rule” for FLSA Retaliation Cases; Holds HR Director May Pursue Claim

On Tuesday, the United States Supreme Court held that the whistleblower protections that apply to employees of publicly traded companies under Section 1514A of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, also  extend to employees of private contractors and subcontractors that serve those public companies.

Continue Reading Supreme Court Holds Sarbanes-Oxley Whistleblower Provision Covers Employees of Private Contractors

A surgeon recently brought suit against his employer, in Staveley-O’Carroll v. Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, alleging that he was fired in violation of the Family and Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”).  No. 1:13-cv-01555-YK (M.D. Pa. filed June 18, 2013). Interestingly, the surgeon is not claiming that he was entitled to, requested, or took FMLA leave.  Rather, he claims that he was retaliated against for defending his secretary’s FMLA rights.

Continue Reading Does The FMLA Protect a Supervisor’s Right To Defend a Subordinate’s Leave Of Absence?

EMPLOYMENT DECISIONS

Vance v. Ball State University: Narrow Definition of Supervisor in Harassment Suits
In Vance, the Supreme Court announced a narrow standard for determining which employees constitute “supervisors” for purposes of establishing vicarious liability under Title VII. In a 5-4 decision, the Court decided that a supervisor is a person authorized to take “tangible employment actions,” such as hiring, firing, promoting, demoting or reassigning employees to significantly different responsibilities. The majority opinion rejected the EEOC’s long-advanced definition that a supervisor is a person who could either make tangible employment actions or direct an employee’s daily work activities. In making this ruling, Justice Alito called the EEOC’s definition a “study in ambiguity.”

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The U.S. Department of Labor provides general information and compliance guidance regarding numerous wage, hour, employment, and labor laws via “fact sheets” which are available to employees, employers, and the general public. Fact sheets can serve as helpful reference and compliance material for employers. On December 23, 2011, the DOL issued three new fact sheets on the issue of unlawful retaliation.  These newly released fact sheets address retaliation under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”), the Family and Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”), and the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Workers Protection Act (“MSPA”).

Continue Reading U.S. Department Of Labor Issues New Retaliation Fact Sheets

The Fair Labor Standards Act, 29 U.S.C. 215(a)(3) ("FLSA") forbids an employer from retaliating against an employee for making prior FLSA complaints.  Simple concept, one would think.  But with most employment related legal issues, the "devil" is often in the details.  What is an "employee," exactly, under the FLSA?  Does it include an applicant for employment, who is retaliated against by a prospective employer?  A divided panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit recently ruled that the answer is "no," rejecting a claim that a prospective employer violated the FLSA by rescinding an employment offer to an applicant after learning about a FLSA lawsuit the applicant filed against her prior employer.  Dellinger v. Sci. Applications Int’l Corp., 2011 U.S. App. LEXIS 16635 (4th Cir. Aug. 12, 2011).

Continue Reading No Retaliation Claim For Applicants Under The FLSA

On August 8, 2011, the Second Circuit issued a decision in Millea v. Metro-North Railroad Co., taking an expansive view of the Family and Medical Leave Act’s (“FMLA”) anti-retaliation provision.  Turning to Title VII for guidance, the Court held that the jury should have received an instruction that broadly defined the term “materially adverse action.”

Continue Reading The Second Circuit Broadens The FMLA’s Anti-Retaliation Provision