Legislative (Federal and State) Developments

As part of the bill funding the federal government, President Biden signed into law the Pregnancy Workers Fairness Act (PWFA) and the PUMP for Nursing Mothers Act (PUMP Act). These relatively unknown laws are important pieces of legislation carrying with them significant changes to the workplace for pregnant employees.
Continue Reading Under the Radar Laws Expand Protections for Pregnant Employees in the Workplace

On December 7, 2022, New York City Council Member Tiffany Cabán along with three other co-sponsors introduced a proposed bill that would prohibit all employers from terminating employees without (1) “just cause” or (2) a bona fide economic reason.  The bill would amend current law which protects “fast food” employees from being terminated without just cause.
Continue Reading New York City Bill Could Fundamentally Change Employer-Employee Relationship for NYC Employers

Voters in the District of Columbia, Nebraska, and Nevada overwhelmingly approved minimum wage-related ballot initiatives during this year’s midterm elections. The political movement to establish a $15.00 minimum wage started in 2012 when 200 New York City fast food workers walked off the job demanding better pay and union rights. Despite inaction by the federal government in the subsequent decade, there continues to be bipartisan support for minimum wage increases, particularly at the state level, as illustrated by the success of these three ballot measures.
Continue Reading D.C., Nebraska, and Nevada Voters Approve Minimum Wage Increases

It is no secret that legislators and regulatory agencies have taken note of companies’ increasing reliance on artificial intelligence (“AI”).  In the employment context, vendors market AI as an efficiency tool that can streamline HR processes and guard against human bias and discrimination.  But as we have previously blogged, undisciplined use of AI may accelerate or introduce discrimination into the workplace.
Continue Reading A Bill of Rights for the Information Age: White House Outlines Principles for Artificial Intelligence Design & Use

We previously posted about Washington, D.C.’s new law governing non-competes, which became effective on October 1, 2022. D.C. employers, however, should be aware of a provision buried in the law that has nothing to do with non-competes and requires action by the end of this month.
Continue Reading What Most Employers in Washington D.C. Need to Do Before October 31

On September 18, 2022, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed into law Assembly Bill (“AB”) 2188, which prohibits employer discrimination based on employees’ use of cannabis off the job and away from the workplace.
Continue Reading New California Legislation Protects Workers’ Personal Marijuana Use

Since we last reported on the delay of the District of Columbia’s Ban on Non-Compete Agreements Act of 2020 (the “Act”), the D.C. Council passed the Non-Compete Clarification Amendment Act of 2022 (the “Amendment”), effective October 1, 2022, which significantly rolled back some of the more prohibitive features of the original 2020 version of the Act.
Continue Reading New Amendments Overhaul D.C. Ban on Non-Competes

Editor’s Note: The California legislature failed to enact the proposed CCPA exemption amendments to Assembly Bill 1102.

On August 16, 2022, California Assembly Member Cooley introduced amendments to Assembly Bill 1102 that would extend the California Consumer Privacy Act’s (“CCPA’s”) temporary exemptions for HR and B2B data for an additional two years – until January 1, 2025. Under the CCPA, these exemptions are set to expire on January 1, 2023, when the amendments to the CCPA made by the California Privacy Rights Act (“CPRA”) become operative.

Continue Reading Update: California Legislation Proposes Extending CCPA Exemptions for HR and B2B Data

Yesterday, a California State Assembly Committee killed a bill that would have extended collective bargaining rights to a larger group of state employees – namely, legislative staffers. Existing state law excludes certain state employees from collective bargaining. The Legislature Employer-Employee Relations Act would “provide employees of the Legislature the right to form, join, and participate in the activities of employee organizations of their own choosing for the purpose of representation on all matters of employer-employee relations.” If passed, the bill would extend collective bargaining rights to nearly 2,000 California legislative employees. California’s Public Employment and Retirement Committee rejected the bill in a 2-3 vote this Wednesday, due to unresolved “procedural, legal, and administrative problems,” according to the Committee Chair.

Continue Reading California Legislature Votes ‘No’ On Legislative Staffer Unionization

Earlier this year, Harris County, Texas, which encompasses a substantial majority of the City of Houston, became the sixth Texas city or county to embrace a “ban the box” policy when it adopted the Fair Chance Policy.
Continue Reading Harris County Becomes Latest in Texas to Adopt a Ban the Box Hiring Policy