A bill recently signed into law in California will require private employers to submit annual “pay data reports” to the Department of Fair Employment and Housing beginning in March 2021. The California law implements a previously announced program rolled back by the Trump administration to expand federal reporting requirements to include employee pay data by race, gender, and ethnicity.
Continue Reading New CA Law Requires Employers to Submit Annual Pay Data Reports

On March 27, 2020, President Trump signed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act into law. One aspect of the CARES Act, the Paycheck Protection Program, permits certain employers to obtain forgivable loans in order to keep employees on the job and to pay overhead costs. 
Continue Reading 10 Fast Facts Small Business Owners Should Know About the Paycheck Protection Program

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic and in an effort to prevent the spread of the virus, many employers are grappling with the need to immediately shut down operations.  This raises the question whether employers must pay out all wages (including paid time off) when employees are temporarily laid off or furloughed. In California, they might.
Continue Reading Will Employers Who Institute Temporary Layoffs In Response To COVID-19 Have To Pay Out All Wages Due At The Time of Layoff? In California, They Might

Under California law, an employee’s prior salary cannot be used to justify a pay disparity.  Now, the same is true under federal law – at least in the Ninth Circuit. In Rizo v. Yovino, the Ninth Circuit recently ruled that an employee’s prior pay history is not a “factor other than sex” that can justify a pay gap under the Federal Equal Pay Act.
Continue Reading 9th Circuit Joins Shifting Terrain of Pay Equity Laws

The competing interests of the business community and tipped workers continue to inform public policy decisions about the minimum wage.  We have previously written about increases in the minimum wage on the state, county and municipal level.  Most recently, the cities of Chicago and Denver tackled this issue and joined the many jurisdictions across the country to approve increases to their minimum wage.
Continue Reading Chicago and Denver Increase Minimum Wage

Illinois joined a handful of other states when its prohibition on employer inquiries into applicants’ prior wage or salary information took effect this week. Under the law, no employers in Illinois can ask about the wage or salary histories of job applicants.
Continue Reading Illinois Bans Employer Inquiries on Salary History, Continues Trend

Earlier this year, a federal court in Illinois decertified a small class of Physicians who alleged gender-based pay discrimination under the Equal Pay Act.  Although not a groundbreaking appellate court decision, the opinion does provide a roadmap for employers facing EPA collective actions, which may gain traction in the wake of increasing media attention on pay disparities.
Continue Reading Decertified Class of Physicians Provides Helpful Reminders for EPA Collective Actions

Yesterday, Governor Cuomo signed the last of several bills that massively overhauls New York State’s discrimination and harassment laws. Employers are advised to take a fresh look at their policies and practices to ensure that they are in line with all the recent changes in New York employment laws.
Continue Reading New York Overhauls Discrimination and Harassment Laws in Second #MeToo Wave

The California Department of Fair Employment and Housing last month filed an enforcement action in Los Angeles Superior Court against Riot Games, Inc. to compel compliance with its ongoing investigation into allegations of gender discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual assault, and retaliation.  While the identified claims are broad, the primary thrust appears to be the contention that female employees at Riot Games are paid less than their male counterparts. 
Continue Reading DFEH Files Enforcement Action For Company’s Alleged Refusal To Cooperate In Systemic Discrimination Investigation